My Conversation with our Founding Fathers.

Imagine you can interview the Founders. What questions would you ask them? How do you think they would respond? I did this little thought exercise and came up with the following: Today it has been my pleasure to sit down with our Founding Fathers and ask a few simple questions about their thoughts on what has become of the US and the Constitution.

I will start first With John Adams. Mr. Adams why a Constitutional Republic, why not a new American Parliament? “A constitution founded on these principles introduces knowledge among the people, and inspires them with a conscious dignity becoming freemen; a general emulation takes place, which causes good humor, sociability, good manners, and good morals to be general. That elevation of sentiment inspired by such a government, makes the common people brave and enterprising. That ambition which is inspired by it makes them sober, industrious, and frugal. There is no good government but what is republican. That the only valuable part of the British constitution is so; for the true idea of a republic is “an empire of laws, and not of men.”’ That, as a republic is the best of governments, so that particular arrangement of the powers of society, or in other words, that form of government which is best contrived to secure an impartial and exact execution of the law, is the best of republics.”

What was your mindset with regards to the American Revolution? “But what do we mean by the American Revolution? Do we mean the American war? The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations…This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution.”

What do you think about God being kicked from our schools and government? “Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other”.
Mr. Washington, What are your thoughts on the US hosting and being a part of the UN? “Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of Republican Government.”

Rep. Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts do you have any thoughts on the current 2nd Amendment assault? “Whenever governments mean to invade the rights and liberties of the people, they always attempt to destroy the militia, in order to raise an army upon their ruins.”

Mr. Mason, It has been taught that the American Revolution was started over a tax on tea, do you have any thoughts? “When the resolution of enslaving America was formed in Great Britain, the British Parliament was advised by an artful man, who was governor of Pennsylvania, to disarm the people; that it was the best and most effectual way to enslave them; but that they should not do it openly, but weaken them, and let them sink gradually.”

Mr. Jefferson What is your stance on the Federal Reserve? “If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered.”

Have you had a chance to form an opinion on Anti-Gun Legislation? Laws that forbid the carrying of arms… disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes… Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.

Can you elaborate? “No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms.”

Senator Henry Lee The argument for more gun legislation was that there isn’t a Militia any longer? “A militia, when properly formed, are in fact the people themselves … and include all men capable of bearing arms.” “To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms…”

Mr. Franklin, would the American people be a little safer with fewer guns? “Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”

Mr. Jefferson do you think there should ever be another American Revolution? God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions, it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty…. And what country can preserve its liberties, if its rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.”

One last question for Mr. Jefferson, Should we look at the Constitution as a living Document and try to make it fit the current mindset? “On every question of construction [of the Constitution], let us carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates, and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text, or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed.”
Article Via: Dcclothesline